Interview With GM Predrag Nikolic

Director of the 41st Bosna Chess Tournament

Bosna Open 2011

The 41st Bosna Chess Tournament is set to take place from 3rd to 12th May at the Grand hotel “Bristol” in Sarajevo, BIH. The tournament is once again of the Open format, with nine rounds of Swiss pairings. On free day, 7th May 2011, “International Championship in Blitz chess” will be organized.

The total prize fund of 51.000 EUR will be distributed through 48 prizes. First place is 10.000 EUR worth.

The Tournament Director, famous Grandmaster Predrag Nikolic, has kindly agreed to answer a couple of questions for Chessdom.com.

Chessdom: Mr Nikolic, thank you for accepting the interview. Please introduce the 41st Bosna Chess Tournament.

Predrag Nikolic: The very long tradition of chess tournaments in Sarajevo has seen some changes last year. This was for the first time that main event was not a round-robin tournament but instead a huge open chess tournament.

Of course, it would be nice to have a round-robin tournament as well, as Sarajevo hosted many leading players, including World Champions Kasparov, Spasky, Petrosian and Tal.

However, funds available are always limited and now I find that open-tournament formula suits much better the needs of young players in the region. Unfortunately, in Bosnia-Herzegovina at the moment we do not have young and strong players who can take part in leading round-robin tournaments. I hope that open tournament will help create more interest and give opportunity to our young players to develop quickly.

Chessdom: You have kept the Bilbao scoring system (3-1-0), and the ECU administration also proposed its implementation in the official competitions. Can you elaborate on the advantages of this system?

Predrag Nikolic: The very first Open 2010 has accepted experimental scoring system. It would be too soon to change that system after only one edition. As a new Tournament Director I believe that there must be several editions with one system before we can properly evaluate advantages and disadvantages of Bilbao system.

As you know, there is lively debate about possible changes that can create more interest and bring more sponsors in our game.

As a somewhat older player I have my opinion about changes. I remember days in early 1990′s when another talk about changes saw introduction of knock-out formula tournaments in chess, hoping that having clear winner in every round will raise more interest. That meant also rapid games, blitz games, sudden death and similar ideas.

But I also remember remarks of one of my colleagues who claimed that our predecessors had strong reasons when they decided that formula of the very first chess tournaments in 19th century was not suitable to chess and was replaced by all-play-all tournaments. Apparently, this system is not suitable to determine who is objectively the best.

This is also why I think that changes for the sake of changes, or changes that will increase chance are not good for chess. Chess is the most objective game of all, and I think that is a quality which deserves to be preserved.

Side effect of this objectivity means that many games should end as a draw. Problem is not a draw in itself, but how it is achieved. In that sense it would be nice if Bilbao system can help.

predrag nikolic

Predrag Nikolic

Chessdom: Sarajevo has an extraordinary tradition in hosting the prestigious chess events. How much can this fact assist you in finding support for the tournament, and how much can be a burden in the sense that you have to maintain and even improve on high standards?

Predrag Nikolic: In general, there is broad support for chess. We always count on support of Canton Sarajevo, Federation and Sarajevo municipality. However, it is never enough and our young and enthusiastic marketing team is working very hard to find sponsors.

Chessdom: What is the current response from the players? Is there an interest among those who participated in the last year’s Open?

Predrag Nikolic: There is a great interest about our tournament. Official registration is somewhat bellow our expectations, but it may be due to the small changes compared to 2010 tournament. Than there was a rather complicated system of registration fee which was changing by date of registration. This year we tried to simplify the system, with a flat fee. However, now there is no incentive to subscribe early, and it results in practically no entries from the region. Actual stand of registration you can follow on our web-site www.skbosna.ba.

Still, we believe that final number of the players will be close to last year tournament. Early entries would make our organizational work easier but we are ready also for certain number of late entries.

I would also like to say something about our formula. We decided to put almost all of available fund into the prize money, with very, very limited amount of money left for direct invitation. That makes us different from other Open tournaments where there is relatively high number of Grandmasters fighting for very limited prizes.

We offer serious prize money and those who take risks and win are handsomely rewarded. I believe that this may work as much better incentive than any Bilbao system, or similar inventions.

Silvio Danailov about the EIWCC, Candidate Matches and changes in the ECU

Interview with the Russian newspaper Sport-Express

The ECU President Silvio Danailov is currently on a mini tour, visiting Cyprus, Georgia and Azerbaijan. Following the news about Georgian interest in hosting the European Individual Women Championship, the Russian newspaper “Sport-Express” contacted Danailov for an interview which could reveal more detail.

“Having received a serious offer from Tbilisi, I came here to discuss the bid with the Mayor of Tbilisi, who heads the organizing committee, and with the Minister of Sports and Youth Affairs of Georgia. I saw a great interest, the proposed venue in the five-star Sheraton Hotel meets all international standards, and if Georgia wins the tender, I have no doubt that the European Championship will be held at the highest level.” – Danailov explained.

He also added that 100.000 EUR is the minimum amount that is being considered for the prize fund, and that perhaps it will be even increased.

Danailov-Vardzelashvili

Silvio Danailov with the Minister of Sports and Youth Affairs of Georgia

The next topic was “How do you assess the chances of Topalov in the Candidates matches in Kazan?”. Danailov responded that “Veselin is currently undertaking a very serious preparation. If he will be ready like prior to the match with Anand, then he will be one of the favourites. I hope in Kazan we will see the good old Topalov!”

Another interesting question was about the changes that Danailov will try to pursue as the President of the ECU: “We have to change a few things. First we have to introduce the Sofia rule into all official competitions. And in the case of intentional triple repetition in a position where you can still fight, the arbiter should have the right to ‘award’ both players with ‘zero’.”

“Second, we have to introduce the football scoring system, which is being used with great effect in Bilbao and London. And finally, we must reduce the time control, the game should last no more than four hours. All kinds of increments should be canceled because they rob the fans off of a spectacular show in the time trouble.”

Full article (Russian), thanks to e3e5.com

Interview with Susan Polgar in Milan by Dario Pedini

Performed after the Conferenza della Fondazione 21 di Paoletti

polgar-21min

D: Susan, let’s start with one of the most topical issues in the chess world at the moment – What do you think of the World Championship format and the forthcoming Candidate matches?

S: I think that it is satisfactory as we are now back to a Classical format, much better than the knock out system used for the latest events.

D: Don’t you think that 4 games aren’t really enough to decide who deserves to go through to the next round, though?

S: Indeed, 4 games aren’t really enough, but you see, finding available dates for these events is a real problem, as is finding suitable sponsors who are able to finance matches that last as long as these.

D: Let’s talk about Carlsen. His withdrawal has raised more than one eyebrow, not to mention the disappointment to his fans. Any comments?

S: It is definitely a blow for chess fans worldwide that Carlsen has decided not to take part in the World Championship cycle, which would have been a good opportunity for his career. However, he is still rather young and he will have plenty of opportunities to play for the title.

D: You have come to Italy for a conference, which was held today (editor’s note – the interview took place in November 2010). Can you tell us a bit about that?

S: I have been invited to take part in the “Conferenza della Fondazione 21 di Paoletti”. It was a very interesting event which I was glad to take part in as a speaker, but which I enjoyed attending as a spectator also. I was amongst the 21 guests, the line up being made up of Nobel prize winners and Olympic champions, and each speaker had to talk for 21 minutes on how he or she managed to become succesful in their chosen field.

Read the full interview on the Scacchierando Blog

Gibraltar is the foremost open tournament in the world

Interview with GM Nigel Short

The first title holder of the Gibraltar international chess festival in 2003, former British Champion, GM Nigel Short, is once again back on the Rock participating in the festival for the fourth time. Nigel also won in 2004, and on his third visit came a close second.

After a break of a number of years he has returned to compete in the Tradewise Chess Festival 2010… as he puts it for the “good weather” but also because he believes that from modest beginnings the festival has now become the foremost open tournament in the world.

“The Gibraltar Festival has grown tremendously. It has never been a weak tournament even in the first year. From modest beginnings, and from the first year, great efforts were made to bring some top players. It is now the foremost open tournament in the world. Everybody agrees Gibraltar is the best opens around,” he says.

Gibraltar gm nigel short

GM Nigel Short

Nigel, who like many players around the world has closely followed the growth of the festival, which he acknowledges has gone from strength to strength, says: “It has built up slowly, and there continues to be a steady increase in numbers with very strong players.”

Is he surprised with the success of the Festival in Gibraltar?

“No. I am not surprised with its success because it has good organisation, and the people behind the event are very enthusiastic about it. That combination coupled with good sponsors, providing you can continue to improve on the event, then it all comes together to be what it is today, a very impressive event.”

Gibraltar IVANCHUK SHORT

Vassily Ivanchuk and Nigel Short

Is he back to win back the Gibraltar title again?

Nigel, who says he is of course out to win the 2011 Gibraltar Master, and even though at the time of releasing this press release was leading the board, believes he has, “a very long shot for winning this tournament, and I say that as someone who has, in my three years here, won it twice, and come second, once. The tournament has improved and there are some really top class players, and there are a lot of them.”

Gibraltar SHORT Kosintseva

Nigel Short and Nadezhda Kosintseva

Alice Mascarenhas, Chess Press Officer

John Saunders, Webmaster

Official website: www.gibraltarchesscongress.com

Meet GM Simon Williams

Tradewise Gibraltar Chess Festival Commentator

The Game of Chess is an “Artistic Pursuit”, says English Chess Grandmaster, author and now the tournament’s new web commentator, Simon Williams. Three days into the tournament he has now settled in behind his desk in the Archie Suite at the Caleta Hotel leading the broadcasts of the ninth Gibraltar Chess Festival.

Playing chess since the age of six Simon became a grandmaster at 27 in 2008. he had already achieved international master status in 1998. In December last year he was joint winner (with Gawain Jones) of the London Chess Classic FIDE Rated Open.

Simon is extremely knowledgable on chess and has written seven books about the game, and produced three DVD’s. “I have quite a lot of experience talking about chess,” he says, as he prepares to gain more experience commenting on the Gibraltar Masters and having at his side the likes of GM Nigel Short.

Gibraltar Simon Williams 3

Nigel Short and Simon Williams

Looking for exciting chess

Excited about being this year’s main commentator on the Rock, Simon is thoroughly enjoying the experience and says he is enjoying his challenge and enjoying the great games and top level encounters. “I simply love chess and I love watching the games, and the players, and this is giving me the opportunity to put my own point of view across, and do what I enjoy the most.”

This is not the first time Simon comes to Gibraltar. He was last here some seven years ago. “Gibraltar is a great event. I have only ever heard good things about Gibraltar. It seems like each year it is really improving with the publicity and the amount of players who participate of all levels. Everyone seems to know about it.”

All the live feed is cutting edge and you don’t seem to get that anywhere else, and it is a good way to open up the market and it is going very well. You can catch Simon daily every afternoon at www.gibraltarchesscongress.com

Gibraltar Simon Williams 1

Swedish GM Emmanuel Berg in a live broadcast with commentator GM Simon Williams

An art form

“I love the game of chess. I love the competition. For me it is an art form,” he says. “I like the fact that every game is different and you can have real adventures playing chess because it is very exciting game. I also like the fact that all chess players have their own playing style so you can take two Grandmasters from completely different walks of life and they can play in completely different way even though they have the same rating.”

What is the best game you have ever played?

“I am hoping that is yet to come. I had a good game against Ivan Sokolov in Reykjavik which I won with a Dutch Defence some four years ago, and it is one that springs to mind.”

Gibraltar Simon Williams 2

Stuart Conquest, Emmanuel Berg and Simon Williams

BOOKS: Play The Classical Dutch (2004); Improve Your Attacking Chess (2008); How To Crush Your Chess Opponents (2009); The New Sicilian Dragon (2010); How To Win At Chess – Quickly! (2010); Dangerous Weapons: The Dutch

DVDs: The Killer Dutch (2009); The Killer French (2010)

FIDE RANKING: Rating: 2513 / World Rank: World (all players):779 / World (active players): 705

Alice Mascarenhas, Chess Press Officer

John Saunders, Webmaster

Official website: www.gibraltarchesscongress.com

Interview With GM Michael Adams

Gibraltar Festival has a big place on the world stage

British and Gibraltar Champion Michael Adams is back in Gibraltar for the Tradewise International Festival. The second seeded player in this year’s tournament, he says he has very pleasant memories after winning the title last year. This is his third time competing in this festival.

Coming back he says, “is a bit of a positive” because he knows he has done well in this festival in the past and admits it is a good feeling to return to a place where one feels comfortable.

“I think it is a small advantage, but of course last year it was a very close event and I only won after a tie break, and this year again there are probably 20, maybe even more players who can win. It is a very open field,” he suggests.

Gibraltar MICKEY ADAMS

Michael Adams

“I think normally if you have played well somewhere it is a sign you feel comfortable there and you enjoy being there, and it is a good feeling. It was a big thing last year winning in Gibraltar right at the start of the year, and throughout the year after that I played quite well. My rating was up a little bit. I won the British Championships and I played well in general.”

About the Tradewise Chess Festival

“The tournament is always growing and this year is even bigger than last year and has a big place on the world stage,” he comments.

He believes the Tradewise International Chess Festival is an established tournament.

“It is no longer a new event but part of the calendar, and it is becoming bigger and bigger. The players here, such as Ivanchuk, is a big thing for the tournament. Then of course, almost all the top female players again, and still in many ways making this the number one female tournament. All this makes it a big event.”

Gibraltar has charm

“The big plus about coming to Gibraltar for the tournament is that people are simply charmed by the place, the great scenery, the sea by the hotel, and the nice weather in general. When people come they find it attractive.”

Gibraltar Nana Dzagnidze Michael Adams

Nana Dzagnidze and Michael Adams in the 2nd round of Tradewise International Festival

How does he rate his chances this year and making it two years in a row?

“You never really know in an open tournament, how you’ll start, you just want to be in with a chance at the end when there are still one or two rounds to go. You still want to be in with a chance to take the first prize, so hopefully you make a good start and get into the lead but if not you want to at least be in touch with the leaders in the closing stages.”

“You always hope for the best but statistically it is a bit optimistic to hope you can win two years running, it is not so likely but you play the games and see what happens. Everyone starts with zero points.”

Alice Mascarenhas, Chess Press Officer

John Saunders, Webmaster

Official website: www.gibraltarchesscongress.com

Interview with IM Alexander Ipatov

IM Ipatov is the strongest U18 player in Spain

Alexander Ipatov


Hello IM Alexander Ipatov, thank you for accepting this interview for Chessdom.com! You are born in Ukraine and represent Spain. Currently the highest rated U18 player in Spain. How did your chess carreer start?

I was born in Lvov (Ukraine) on the 16th of July 1993. My father showed me how to move chess pieces when I was 4. The first time I went to the Lvov chess club in 1999 at the age of 6. Things started rolling and soon after came my first success. It was the second place in the Ukranian Youth Chess Championship U10 which took place in Nikolaev, March 2003.

Ukraine is a chess country, with good traditions, strong players, and multiple talents. So such tournament success at young age inspired me, and also inspired the people around me to upgrade my chess skills.


However, not everything seemed smooth. In 2009 you changed the federation from Ukranian to Spanish.What was the reason?

Ok… This is the other side of the story. It happened because I was very dissatisfacted with the work of Ukranian Chess Federation. My chess growth was continuing, performing well in multiple local events. In 2008 I became twice vice-champion of Ukraine U16 and U20 (!) at a time when I was years younger than the other competitors. My desire and rightfull choice was to go to the European Youth Chess Championship because I’ve already played in WYCC in 2003 and 2007, but Ukranian Chess Federation rejected it. Another similar case followed: In 2008 Ukranian Youth Team had to go the World Youth Chess Olympiad U16 having in the team all the players higher than 2400, but Ukranian Chess Federation did not desire to cover even part of the travel expenses.

As far as I know now the things with Ukranian Chess Federation is going better due to the election of the new President Mr.Kapustin. Anyhow, I’m happy now and I am proud to represent Spanish Chess Federation! There I feel valued and my talent is being developed accordingly.


Such success at early age surely secures for you participation for international clubs.

In Spain I play for the Catalan chess club C.E. Barbera. It is one of the strongest clubs in Catalonia and formally entered TOP-15 in Spain, a championship that is often considered the best in the world. My club won Primera Division of the Spanish Club Championship in 2009 and in 2010 we played in Division d’Honor, but,unfortunately, we descended from it and the next year we will again play in Primera Division. The club has strong players like GM Bruzon, GM Quesada, GM Postny, GM Leon Hoyos, GM Lemos, and myself in the championship, so I hope next year we will be in Division de Honor again and compete for the top positions.

In Ukraine I play for Law Academy chess club which is one of the top clubs in Ukraine and has superstars in the team like GM Eljanov and GM Moiseenko. The next year we will be fighting for the first place in the Ukranian Team Chess Championship.

To be honest, these are the only two clubs I am involved with right now. I have desire to play for more teams and I hope to make more national championship participations in 2011.

Alexander Ipatov


You are an International Master, but your rating is Grandmaster level. For the past lists you have been constantly above 2500.

Yes, this is true. I am still an international master. I have one grandmaster norm, I took it in the Moscow open 2010 with the perfomance of 2675.I was very near of the second and third norms in three Spanish opens this summer. Sooner or later it will come, for now my goal is to break 2600 as soon as possible and to enter the top 100 list.


That means you are working hard?

At the moment I am working with several coaches. Some of them are short term, some longer. A key to my preparation in the past one year has been IM Miodrag Perunovic, truly amazing coach that is producing champions like a chess champions factory. He surely has a very positive effect on me as well. Recently I started also with GM Grivas, who is a FIDE senior trainer and a true professional in the field.


Your nearest competitions?

From 13th January untill 13th February I will stay in Barcelona. I will help C.E.Barbera in Catalan Cup and Catalan Club Chess Championship. In February-March Law Academy is going to organize Closed GM tournament “Rector Cup”, I will play there as well.

For the other months I do not have a fixed calendar, there are many events these days, especially in Europe. I like the fact that chess is developing and there are more opportunities for us, the professional chess players.

sofia blitz

First place at the strong Sofia Blitz, parallel to the match Topalov – Anand

ipatov

Winning the first GM norm at Moscow Open

Interview With GM Eltaj Safarli

Winner of the Chigorin Memorial interviewed by IM Alexander Ipatov

Alexander Ipatov – What are your highest achievements in chess?

Eltaj Safarli – I am many times Champion and medalist of the European and World Youth Chess Championships. I was also the winner of the international tournaments like Hoogeven 2007, shared Benasque 2010, Chigorin Memorial 2010. The Champion of the Higher League of Azerbaijan 2010.

A.I. – How do you prepare? Do you have sparring-partners, coaches? How many hours do you train daily?

E.S. – According to the intensive tournament schedule, I am not able to work on all components of chess play, but after finishing the Chigorin Memorial I will have more time for deeper study. My sparring partner and friend is Djakhangir Agaragimov.

Eltaj Safarli

Eltaj Safarli at the Chigorin Memorial

A.I. – What is chess for you? A profession, hobby, art or passion?

E.S. – For me chess is a profession and art.

A.I. – What is your opinion about the organization of the 2010 Chigorin Memorial?

E.S. – I’d like to say a “big thanks” to the organizers of the Chigorin Memorial, WGM Irina Sudakova and Mr.Vladimir Bykov. The organization of the event was on the top level.

A.I. – What are your next tournaments?

E.S. – In the forthcoming events, probably, I will take participation in Bansko Grand Chess Open 2010.

Eltaj Safarli

Eltaj Safarli at the tournament in India

A.I. – You are playing for one of the strongest European clubs – “Socar”. Can you give us insights about your club? What goals did the Board of Directors set in front of the players?

E.S. – The Chess Club “Socar” was formed earlier this year. My club was playing for the first time in the European Club Championship. “Socar” is very ambitious, and although we didn’t win this year’s ECC, I am certain that next time we will take a medal in that event. I am very grateful to the Vice-President of the Azerbaijan Chess Federation and the Manager of “Socar” Mr.Mahir Mamedov for establishing such a great club.

A.I. – At the recently finished Chess Olympiad in Khanty-Mansiysk you were playing for the National Team of Azerbaijan. Tell us about your and team’s performance there.

E.S. – In the Chess Olympiad our team and myself didn’t have enough luck but again I hope that on the next Olympiad we will be among the medalists.

Interview With GM Pablo Lafuente

by IM Alexander Ipatov

Interview with Argentinian Grandmaster Pablo Lafuente was performed during the Mikhail Chigorin Memorial, which recently concluded in St.Petersburg. GM Lafuente won the very strong 14th Int. Neckar-Open earlier this year.

Alexander Ipatov – Where were you born and where are you currently living?

Pablo Lafuente – I was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, twenty five years ago. In 2008 I moved to Barcelona (Spain) where I am currently living.

A.I. – When and how did you start playing chess?

P.L. – I started playing chess when I was 5 years old, and it was thanks to my father, as he was the person who taught me how to play. And I immediately liked the game, surprisingly enough, considering that back at that time, I wouldn’t stay quiet for more than two seconds.

A.I. – How do you train yourself? Do you study with colleagues?

P.L. – Over the last few years, I have been mainly studying alone, and occasionally meeting with friends and colleagues. Probably (or should I say, almost certainly) that’s not the best way to train. It’s really hard for me to be my own boss, and I don’t always succeed in keeping my discipline.

Neckar Open

Pablo Lafuente during the Neckar-Open

A.I. – What is your opinion about the Chigorin Memorial?

P.L. – I like this tournament very much, and as a matter of fact, I was here in Saint Petersburg last year, as well, taking part in the same festival and I am glad to be here once again. It’s a pleasant tournament to play, and the kindness of the organizers also counts.

This year, however, my performance so far has unfortunately not been so good. I hope the last rounds will be better. But then, on the other hand, I must acknowledge that I had a very good performance in the strong rapid tournament that took place over the first two days, where I shared the first place.

And as for the city itself, although the tournament is demanding and we don’t have so much time left to visit the place, I enjoy walking around and taking the metro with its endless escalators. Nevertheless, my experience with Russian Cuisine must certainly be widened next time.

A.I. – What are you planning to do over the next months?

P.L. – I have been playing quite a lot lately, so I think I will take a rest after this tournament. I need to sit down and analyze a lot of my games. So, that’s one of my short-term aims, for the next two months, approximately. By late January, the Catalan League begins, and in 2011, I would also like to play in Moscow, the Moscow Open or Aeroflot, or maybe both…

A.I. – How many languages do you speak?

P.L. – I speak Spanish, English and Catalan, or “sort of” Catalan actually, because I can understand it, but I’m afraid I’m not fluent enough yet so as to speak it properly.

Pablo Lafuente

A.I. – What does chess mean to you?

P.L. – Chess started being ‘just a game’ for me, although I think that – as it happens to many others colleagues, too – ever since I was a child, I’ve had a ‘vocation for chess’. But many years ago, when I finished High School, I decided that chess was going to be my profession, my work. And it is difficult because I have many mixed feelings. I have been playing chess for almost my entire life and of course many of my personals goals are set down on chess, too. So, depending on how you look at it, chess is even more than a job for me.

A.I. – What do you do in your free time? Any hobbies?

P.L. – I like reading, and I try to be updated and well-informed by reading the newspapers.

Moreover, something that I discovered as I arrived in Catalunya, because I honestly didn’t know it existed before, but it soon became very appealing to me: Castells (literally, “human towers”), a historical and traditional activity in the region of Catalunya. So, once a week, I meet with my castells-mates to practice. It’s a very interesting experience and I really enjoy it.

And with regard to my physical training… ok, I can’t lie to you: I haven’t been doing much lately, but I would like to resume bike-riding and also go running.

A.I. – What Chess Websites do you often use?

P.L. – I usually visit “Twic Website”, Chessbase (both in Spanish and in English), Chessvibes, Europe-Echecs, Fide Website, Chesscafe.
I became aware of the existence of the Chessdom Website relatively recently, but since then, I’ve been reading it periodically.

A.I. – Who is your favorite player?

P.L. – Well, actually, I don’t have a favorite player. Instead, I try to take from each player what I consider to be his/her most interesting and positive traits.

Interview with IM Mikhail Mozharov

Mikhail Mozharov in conversation with Alexander Ipatov during Chigorin Memorial

mozharov


Alexander Ipatov : Here we are with IM Mikhail Mozharov, one of the most
talented juniors in Russia, who is participating at the Chigorin Memorial. At which age did you start playing chess and what are your main achievements in chess?

Mikhail Mozharov : I started playing chess at the age of 7. My main successes were: the 2nd place in Russian Rapid Chess Championship U16 in 2006, the 3rd in Russian Rapid Chess Championship U18
in 2008, winner of the Children Team Champion of Russia 2006 with the team of Nizhni
Novgorod,the 1st board, shared the 3rd place in the World School Championship
U16 in 2005 in Greece. In non-junior chess I don’t have so many achievements like in
children competitions, but I have performed well in some of them, like sharing 1-2 place in Vladimir
open 2010 (the Stage of Russia Cup).


Alexander Ipatov : Quite an impressive run so for. For which club are you playing now?

Mikhail Mozharov : I finished the Petrosian chess school (famous graduates of this club are
Alexander Morozevich and Sergei Grigoriants). Now I’m playing for Chess
Club “Mephi”. I will be trying to help the club in Russian High League in Dagomys 2011. The
manager of “Mephi” is Mr. Vladimir Kravchenko, he is making a lot for the development
of our club.


Alexander Ipatov : How are you working on chess? Who are your seconds and coaches?

Mikhail Mozharov : I am working on chess with Nikolay Chepel (my best
friend) and GM Ivan Popov. My consultant is the famous chess coach Alexander
Nikitin (ex-trainer of Karpov, Kasparov, etc).


Alexander Ipatov : What do you think about the organization of the Chigorin Memorial?

Mikhail Mozharov : I’m playing in the Chigorin Memorial the first time.The
Organization Committee has offered three options with accommodation:
Hotel “Moscow”, Hotel “Saint-Petersburg”, and Hotel “FINEC”, all of them are
very good. In general, my friend Nikolay Chepel (in the first round he brought a
sensation beating GM Kryakvin) and me want to say a big “thanks” to WGM Irina
Sudakova
for the excellent conditions that she has provided.We are enjoying the
tournament!


Alexander Ipatov : What are your following tournaments?

Mikhail Mozharov : My next tournament will be the Final Cup of Russia in Belgorod. It will start
immediately after the Chigorin Memorial.